8 Tips from NASA To Photograph A Solar Eclipse

When taking photographs of a solar eclipse, it is important to prioritize safety by never looking directly at the sun without proper eye protection and using a tripod for stability. Experimentation is key, try different lens options and shoot in RAW format for post-processing flexibility. Plan your shots by familiarizing yourself with the path of the eclipse and the timing of its phases. Finally, experiment with different exposures to capture the details in the sun’s corona during the total phase of the eclipse.

Eclipse

6 Tips to Photograph The Solar Eclipse in New Jersey

  1. Safety First – To take pictures of the Sun, you will need a solar filter to protect your camera lens, similar to sunglasses for your eyes. This is important so you don’t damage your camera. However, during the Eclipse when the Moon is completely blocking the sun, be sure to remove it. Having a tripod will also help take still photos, especially if you have a delayed shutter release timer on.
  2. Any Camera Will Work – If you don’t have a high-end DSLR not to worry! You can still capture the transformation in the sky with your smartphone, after all the image is the one you envision and capture. If you don’t have a telephoto lens for your DSLR, use a landscape lens to capture the environment around you instead.
  3. Look Everywhere – Everyone’s eyes will be on the Sun and Moon, but while the event is taking place, be sure to look around you. Your environment will look very eerie at some points and there will be long shadows across the land. Another tip that NASA Photographer Bill Ingalls recommends is taking pictures of the people around you and their expressions while witnessing this event.
  4. Practice – Knowing the settings and proper way to use your camera before the event is important. Using your exposure settings (yes, even your smartphone has that!) will be most helpful during the Eclipse. For DSLR cameras, know the right aperture and shutter speeds are important.
  5. Experiment with different lens options – A telephoto lens with a long focal length will magnify the image of the sun, while a wide-angle lens will give you a more expansive view of the surroundings.
  6. Shooting in RAW – Shooting in RAW format will give you the most flexibility when post-processing your images, allowing you to adjust exposure, white balance, and other settings.
  7. Plan your shots – Familiarize yourself with the path of the eclipse, the timing of the various phases, and the best location to shoot from ahead of time.
  8. Experiment with exposures – Experiment with different exposures to capture the details in the sun’s corona during the total phase of the eclipse.
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For more resources and tips see the links below to the NASA website for further details about the Eclipse:

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